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How Much Do You Have to Make to File Taxes in 2019

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Filing taxes is no easy thing and many of the rules are adjusted to compensate for the changes in the economy and individual income. It is important to gather together all necessary tax information before filing with the IRS.

According to certain stipulations set by the Internal Revenue Service, if your income falls below a certain point, you may not even need to file taxes. Certain healthcare providers might require a tax return, even if your income falls below the threshold. If circumstances do not apply to your situation, will filing really be necessary?

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How Much Do You Have to Make to File Taxes?

When filing, the income-based tax is affected by how you plan on filing a said tax return. Of course, whether or not your income meets the threshold requirement. Your income will also affect which tax bracket the IRS recognizes you as being a part of.

How Much You Have to Make Based on Filing Status

Before filing taxes, ask yourself if you are planning on as head of household, married filing jointly, married filing separately, or filing single (no spouse or dependent). Here are the details on filing for each category:

Single: For any persons who are single and under the age of 65, $12,000 is the minimum amount of gross annual income that requires filing a tax return. Any person 65 or older who plans on filing single, will be required to if their minimum gross annual income is $13,600.

Married and filing jointly: When filing jointly as a married couple, it depends on the age of both partners, doubling what is required of a single person filing for taxes. If you are both under age 65, your joint income must be at least $24,000. If you and your partner are above 65 years of age, a minimum of $26,600 is required. Split the difference if only one of you is 65 or older, and you need to make at least $25,300.

Qualifying Widower: A qualifying widower (meaning your spouse died in the current tax year) with a dependent child, still retains the ability to file as married filing jointly, with the age disparity still applicable: $24,000 if you are under age 65, and at least $25,300 if you are 65 years of age or older.

Married and Filing Separately: There is a little less headache, it seems, to file this way. When filing as married and filing separately, the required gross income is a paltry $5 to file a tax return.

Head of Household: HOH’s are typically the majority income earner and often file with listed dependents, such as children and a spouse that stays at home. As an HOH, you are required to file a tax return if you are under the age of 65 and make at least $18,000. If you are 65 or older, the income required to file jumps to $19,600.

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How Much Do You have to make if you’re a Dependent?

Even if someone in your home filed as head of household, listing you as a dependent, you may still have to file taxes yourself. Many factors affect whether or not a dependent needs to file, such as earned and unearned (or passive income), gross income and their minimums are all determined by age and if you are blind.

A single dependent who is not blind and under 65, will need to file taxes if:

  • You made more than $1,050 is unearned income
  • You made more than $12,000 in earned income
  • Your gross income was more than the larger of either $1,050 or your earned income up to $11,650 plus $350
  • A single dependent who is either 65 or legally blind, will need to file taxes if:
  • You made more than $2,650 in unearned income
  • You made more than $13,600 in earned income
  • Your gross income was more than the larger of either $2,650 or your earned income up to $11,650 plus $1,950

Do You Have to File Taxes if you’re a Student?

Your parents can claim you on their taxes until the age of 19, with that period extending to age 24 should you decide to continue your education. If most of your money comes from student loans and government grants, there’s no need to worry since the Fed does not recognize either as taxable income.
In certain situations, students can claim education-specific tax credits like the American Opportunity Credit.

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