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50 US States At Risk Of Losing The Most Jobs Because Of The Pandemic

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A recession seems to be on the horizon as more and more businesses have to lay off workers and close their doors temporarily. Some US states could be prone to being hit harder by the economic chaos than others.

The Economic Policy Institute recently shared their analysis of predicted job losses in every state by this summer. Read on to find out how your state ranks among others.

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50. Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.80%, with an estimate of 206,169 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.10%

Pennsylvania’s 2018 total gross state product (GSP) of $803 billion ranks the state 6th in the nation. If Pennsylvania were an independent country, its economy would rank as the 19th-largest in the world.

49. Connecticut

Connecticut is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 56,735 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.90%

Finance and insurance is Connecticut’s largest industry, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, generating 16.4% of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2009. Separately, the real estate industry accounted for an additional 15% of economic activity in 2009. Manufacturing is the third biggest industry at 11.9% of GDP and dominated by Hartford-based United Technologies Corporation (UTC), which employs more than 22,000 people in Connecticut.

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48. Illinois

Illinois is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 206,648 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.80%

With Chicago in northeastern Illinois, small industrial cities and immense agricultural productivity in the north and center of the state, and natural resources such as coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base, and is a major transportation hub.

47. Indiana

Indiana is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 107,271 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 23.00%

Indiana has a diverse economy with a gross state product of $359.12 billion in 2017. Indiana has several metropolitan areas with populations greater than 100,000 and a number of smaller industrial cities and towns. Indiana is home to professional sports teams, including the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts and the NBA’s Indiana Pacers, and hosts several notable athletic events, including the Indianapolis 500.

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46. Massachusetts

Massachusetts is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 125,432 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.50%

Sectors vital to the Massachusetts economy include higher education, biotechnology, information technology, finance, health care, tourism, manufacturing, and defense. The Route 128 corridor and Greater Boston continue to be a major center for venture capital investment, and high technology remains an important sector. In recent years tourism has played an ever-important role in the state’s economy, with Boston and Cape Cod being the leading destinations.

45. Minnesota

Minnesota is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 98,487 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.30%

Minnesota’s standard of living index is among the highest in the United States, and the state is also among the best-educated and wealthiest in the nation. In recent years, its economy has greatly diversified, shifting from traditional activities such as agriculture and resource extraction to services and finance.

44. Nebraska

Nebraska is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 33,702 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 23.40%

Nebraska has a large agriculture sector, and is a major producer of beef, pork, corn (maize), soybeans, and sorghum. Other important economic sectors include freight transport (by rail and truck), manufacturing, telecommunications, information technology, and insurance.

43. New York

New York is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 322,494 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.60%

New York’s gross state product in 2018 was $1.7 trillion. If New York State were an independent nation, it would rank as the 11th largest economy in the world. However, in 2013, the multi-state, New York City-centered metropolitan statistical area produced a gross metropolitan product (GMP) of nearly $1.4 trillion, while in 2012, the corresponding combined statistical area generated a GMP of over $1.7 trillion, both ranking first nationally by a wide margin and behind the GDP of only nine nations.

42. Ohio

Ohio is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 189,518 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 23.40%

Ohio is an industrial state, ranking 8th out of 50 states in GDP, is the third largest US state for manufacturing, and is the second largest producer of automobiles behind Michigan.

41. Wisconsin

Wisconsin is projected to have private sector employment decline by 3.90%, with an estimate of 100,149 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 22.60%

Wisconsin is one of the nation’s leading dairy producers and is known as “America’s Dairyland”; it is particularly famous for its cheese. Manufacturing (especially paper products), information technology, cranberries, ginseng, and tourism are also major contributors to the state’s economy.

40. Arkansas

Arkansas is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 42,659 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.10%

Once a state with a cashless society in the uplands and plantation agriculture in the lowlands, Arkansas’s economy has evolved and diversified. The state’s gross domestic product (GDP) was $119 billion in 2015. Six Fortune 500 companies are based in Arkansas, including the world’s #1 retailer, Walmart; Tyson Foods, J.B. Hunt, Dillard’s, Murphy USA, and Windstream are also headquartered in the state.

39. Iowa

Iowa is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 53,117 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.10%

CNBC’s list of “Top States for Business in 2010” has recognized Iowa as the sixth best state in the nation. Scored in 10 individual categories, Iowa was ranked 1st when it came to the “Cost of Doing Business”; this includes all taxes, utility costs, and other costs associated with doing business.

38. Kansas

Kansas is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 45,995 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 23.40%

Nearly 90% of Kansas’s land is devoted to agriculture. The state’s agricultural outputs are cattle, sheep, wheat, sorghum, soybeans, cotton, hogs, corn, and salt. As of 2018, there were 59,600 farms in Kansas, 86 (0.14%) of which are certified organic farms.

37. Michigan

Michigan is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 151,316 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 23.50%

Although Michigan developed a diverse economy, it is widely known as the center of the U.S. automotive industry, which developed as a major economic force in the early 20th century. It is home to the country’s three major automobile companies. While sparsely populated, the Upper Peninsula is important for tourism thanks to its abundance of natural resources, while the Lower Peninsula is a center of manufacturing, forestry, agriculture, services, and high-tech industry.

36. New Jersey

New Jersey is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 142,223 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 23.50%

As of 2018, New Jersey was home to the highest number of millionaires per capita of all U.S. states. The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that New Jersey’s gross state product in the fourth quarter of 2018 was $639.8 billion.

35. North Dakota

North Dakota is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 14,290 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.20%

In the 21st century, North Dakota’s natural resources have played a major role in its economic performance, particularly with the oil extraction from the Bakken formation, which lies beneath the northwestern part of the state. Such development has led to population growth and reduced unemployment, resulting in North Dakota’s having the second lowest unemployment rate in the nation.

34. Virginia

Virginia is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.00%, with an estimate of 134,663 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.60%

Virginia’s economy has many sectors: agriculture in the Shenandoah Valley; federal agencies in Northern Virginia, including the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); and military facilities in Hampton Roads, the site of the region’s main seaport.

33. California

California is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 603,741 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.90%

The five largest sectors of employment in California are trade, transportation, and utilities; government; professional and business services; education and health services; and leisure and hospitality. In output, the five largest sectors are financial services, followed by trade, transportation, and utilities; education and health services; government; and manufacturing.

32. Georgia

Georgia is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 161,334 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.40%

Georgia’s 2018 total gross state product was $602 billion. For years Georgia as a state has had the highest credit rating by Standard & Poor’s (AAA) and is one of only 15 states with a AAA rating. If Georgia were a stand-alone country, it would be the 28th largest economy in the world, based on data from 2005.

31. Kentucky

Kentucky is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 66,777 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.30%

Early in its history, Kentucky gained recognition for its excellent farming conditions. Today Kentucky’s economy has expanded to importance in non-agricultural terms as well, especially in auto manufacturing, energy fuel production, and medical facilities.

30. Maryland

Maryland is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 92,046 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.80%

The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Maryland’s gross state product in 2016 was $382.4 billion. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Maryland households are currently the wealthiest in the country, with a 2013 median household income of $72,483 which puts it ahead of New Jersey and Connecticut, which are second and third respectively.

29. Missouri

Missouri is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 100,343 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.90%

Missouri major industries include aerospace, transportation equipment, food processing, chemicals, printing/publishing, electrical equipment, light manufacturing, financial services and beer.

28. Oregon

Oregon is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 68,104 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.80%

Because of its diverse landscapes and waterways, Oregon’s economy is largely powered by various forms of agriculture, fishing, and hydroelectric power. Oregon is also the top timber producer of the contiguous United States, and the timber industry dominated the state’s economy in the 20th century. Technology is another one of Oregon’s major economic forces, beginning in the 1970s.

27. Rhode Island

Rhode Island is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 17,771 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 24.70%

The Rhode Island economy had a colonial base in fishing. The Blackstone River Valley was a major contributor to the American Industrial Revolution. For a while, Rhode Island was one of the leaders in textiles. However, with the Great Depression, most textile factories relocated to southern U.S. states. The textile industry still constitutes a part of the Rhode Island economy but does not have the same power that it once had.

Other important industries in Rhode Island’s past included toolmaking, costume jewelry, and silverware.

26. Tennessee

Tennessee is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 110,670 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.50%

Tennessee’s major industries include agriculture, manufacturing, and tourism. Poultry, soybeans, and cattle are the state’s primary agricultural products, and major manufacturing exports include chemicals, transportation equipment, and electrical equipment.

25. Texas

Texas is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 442,717 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.10%

With a growing base of industry, the state leads in many industries, including tourism, agriculture, petrochemicals, energy, computers and electronics, aerospace, and biomedical sciences.

24. Utah

Utah is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 53,452 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.10%

The state has a highly diversified economy, with major sectors including transportation, education, information technology and research, government services, and mining and a major tourist destination for outdoor recreation. In 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Utah had the second-fastest-growing population of any state.

23. Washington

Washington is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.10%, with an estimate of 119,145 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 25.60%

Washington is one of the wealthiest and most socially progressive states in the country. Washington has a relatively strong economy, with a total gross state product of $569.449 billion in 2018, placing it 10th in the nation and growing by 5.7 percent per year—the fastest rate in the United States.

22. Alabama

Alabama is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 70,159 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 26.10%

The state has invested in aerospace, education, health care, banking, and various heavy industries, including automobile manufacturing, mineral extraction, steel production and fabrication. By 2006, crop and animal production in Alabama was valued at $1.5 billion. In contrast to the primarily agricultural economy of the previous century, this was only about 1% of the state’s gross domestic product.

21. Arizona

Arizona is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 104,914 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 26.10%

The state government is Arizona’s largest employer, while Banner Health is the state’s largest private employer, with over 39,000 employees (2016). The top employment sectors are trade, transportation, and untilities, government, education and health services, professional and business services, leisure and hospitality.

20. Colorado

Colorado is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 97,912 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 26.50%

CNBC’s list of “Top States for Business for 2010” has recognized Colorado as the third-best state in the nation, falling short only to Texas and Virginia. The state’s economy broadened from its mid-19th-century roots in mining when irrigated agriculture developed, and by the late 19th century, raising livestock had become important. Early industry was based on the extraction and processing of minerals and agricultural products. Current agricultural products are cattle, wheat, dairy products, corn, and hay.

19. Delaware

Delaware is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 16,727 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 26.40%

The state’s largest employers are government, education, banking, chemical, pharmaceutical, technology, healthcare, farming, and retail. More than half of all U.S. publicly traded companies, and 63% of the Fortune 500, are incorporated in Delaware. The state’s attractiveness as a corporate haven is largely because of its business-friendly corporation law

18. Idaho

Idaho is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 26,819 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 27.00%

Industries significant for the state economy include manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry, and tourism. A number of science and technology firms are either headquartered in Idaho or have factories there, and the state also contains the Idaho National Laboratory, which is the country’s largest Department of Energy facility.

17. North Carolina

North Carolina is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 161,363 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 26.50%

The state has a very diverse economy because of its great availability of hydroelectric power, its pleasant climate, and its wide variety of soils. The state ranks third among the South Atlantic states in population, but leads the region in industry and agriculture. North Carolina leads the nation in the production of tobacco, textiles, and furniture. Charlotte, the state’s largest city, is a major textile and trade center.

16. Oklahoma

Oklahoma is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.20%, with an estimate of 56,213 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 26.00%

A major producer of natural gas, oil, and agricultural products, Oklahoma relies on an economic base of aviation, energy, telecommunications, and biotechnology. Both Oklahoma City and Tulsa serve as Oklahoma’s primary economic anchors, with nearly two-thirds of Oklahomans living within their metropolitan statistical areas.

15. Louisiana

Louisiana is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.30%, with an estimate of 71,452 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 27.80%

In 2014, Louisiana was ranked as one of the most small business friendly states, based on a study drawing upon data from more than 12,000 small business owners. The state’s principal agricultural products include seafood, cotton, soybeans, cattle, sugarcane, poultry and eggs, dairy products, and rice. Industry generates chemical products, petroleum and coal products, processed foods and transportation equipment, and paper products. Tourism is an important element in the economy, especially in the New Orleans area.

14. Maine

Maine is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.30%, with an estimate of 23,114 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 28.00%

Maine’s agricultural outputs include poultry, eggs, dairy products, cattle, wild blueberries, apples, maple syrup, and maple sugar. Maine’s industrial outputs consist chiefly of paper, lumber and wood products, electronic equipment, leather products, food products, textiles, and bio-technology. Tourism and outdoor recreation play a major and increasingly important role in Maine’s economy.

13. New Hampshire

New Hampshire is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.30%, with an estimate of 25,726 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 28.10%

New Hampshire today has a broad-based and growing economy, with a state GDP growth rate of 2.2% in 2018. The state’s largest economic sectors in 2018, based on contribution to GDP, are: 15% real estate and rental and leasing; 13% professional business services; 12% manufacturing; 10% government and government services; and 9% health care and social services.

12. New Mexico

New Mexico is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.30%, with an estimate of 29,016 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 28.20%

Oil and gas production, tourism, and federal government spending are important drivers of the state economy. State government has an elaborate system of tax credits and technical assistance to promote job growth and business investment, especially in new technologies.

11. South Dakota

South Dakota is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.30%, with an estimate of 15,402 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 27.30%

The service industry is the largest economic contributor in South Dakota. This sector includes the retail, finance, and health care industries. Citibank, which was the largest bank holding company in the United States at one time, established national banking operations in South Dakota in 1981 to take advantage of favorable banking regulations. Government spending is another important segment of the state’s economy, providing over ten percent of the gross state product.

10. West Virginia

West Virginia is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.30%, with an estimate of 24,255 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 27.30%

The economy of West Virginia nominally would be the 62nd largest economy globally behind Iraq and ahead of Croatia according to 2009 World Bank projections, and the 64th largest behind Iraq and ahead of Libya according to 2009 International Monetary Fund projections.

9. Alaska

Alaska is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.40%, with an estimate of 10,946 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 28.70%

While it has one of the smallest state economies in the country, Alaska’s per capita income is among the highest, owing to a diversified economy dominated by fishing, natural gas, and oil, all of which it has in abundance. United States armed forces bases and tourism are also a significant part of the economy; more than half the state is federally owned public land, including a multitude of national forests, parks, and wildlife refuges.

8. South Carolina

South Carolina is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.40%, with an estimate of 79,802 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 28.80%

Major agricultural outputs of the state are tobacco, poultry, cotton, cattle, dairy products, soybeans, hay, rice, and swine. Industrial outputs include textile goods, chemical products, paper products, machinery, automobiles, automotive products and tourism. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of March 2012, South Carolina had 1,852,700 nonfarm jobs of which 12% are in manufacturing, 11.5% are in leisure and hospitality, 19% are in trade, transportation, and utilities, and 11.8% are in education and health services. The service sector accounts for 83.7% of the South Carolina economy.

7. Vermont

Vermont is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.40%, with an estimate of 11,334 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 28.50%

Vermont’s economic activity of $34 billion in 2018 ranked 52nd on the list of U.S. states and territories by GDP (every state plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico were larger), but 34th in GDP per capita.

6. Florida

Florida is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.50%, with an estimate of 352,753 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 30.20%

The five largest sectors of employment in Florida are: trade, transportation, and utilities; government; professional and business services; education and health services; and leisure and hospitality. In output, the five largest sectors are: finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing, followed by professional and business services; government and government enterprises; educational services, health care, and social assistance; and retail trade.

5. Mississippi

Mississippi is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.50%, with an estimate of 40,929 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 29.70%

Mississippi’s rank as one of the poorest states is related to its dependence on cotton agriculture before and after the Civil War, late development of its frontier bottomlands in the Mississippi Delta, repeated natural disasters of flooding in the late 19th and early 20th century that required massive capital investment in levees, and ditching and draining the bottomlands, and slow development of railroads to link bottomland towns and river cities.

4. Wyoming

Wyoming is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.50%, with an estimate of 9,850 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 29.70%

The mineral extraction industry and travel and tourism sector are the main drivers behind Wyoming’s economy. The federal government owns about 50% of its landmass, while 6% is controlled by the state. Total taxable values of mining production in Wyoming for 2001 was over $6.7 billion. The tourism industry accounts for over $2 billion in revenue for the state.

3. Montana

Montana is projected to have private sector employment decline by 4.60%, with an estimate of 18,230 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 31.80%

The economy is primarily based on agriculture, including ranching and cereal grain farming. Other significant economic resources include oil, gas, coal, hard rock mining, and lumber. The health care, service, and government sectors also are significant to the state’s economy. The state’s fastest-growing sector is tourism. Nearly 13 million tourists annually visit Glacier National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Beartooth Highway, Flathead Lake, Big Sky Resort, and other attractions.

2. Hawaii

Hawaii is projected to have private sector employment decline by 5.10%, with an estimate of 26,926 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 37.30%

Since statehood in 1959, tourism has been the largest industry, contributing 24.3% of the gross state product (GSP), despite efforts to diversify. Hawaiian exports include food and clothing. These industries play a small role in the Hawaiian economy, due to the shipping distance to viable markets, such as the West Coast of the contiguous U.S.

1. Nevada

Nevada is projected to have private sector employment decline by 5.30%, with an estimate of 66,656 jobs lost. Share of state employment in the leisure, hospitality, and retail industries: 40.20%

The economy of Nevada is tied to tourism (especially entertainment and gambling related), mining, and cattle ranching. Nevada’s industrial outputs are tourism, mining, machinery, printing and publishing, food processing, and electric equipment.

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